The cure for the loneliness of command

Manfred Kets De Vries | 18 Mar 2019

‘It’s lonely at the top’ is an old cliché, but for many top executives, it’s a harsh reality. Too often, though, this loneliness goes unaddressed as executives try instead to keep up a hero facade.

The transformational leap in healthcare

Rod Collins

Healthcare systems are designed to leverage the individual intelligence of the physician. But that’s all about to change as digitization radically changes the basic rules about the entire healthcare model operates.

Staying on track isn't easy

Wayne Turmel

It's surprising how often teams lose sight of their goals. There are plenty of reasons, and maybe understanding some of the most common will help you and your team reassess where you are headed.

Engaging change: six tips for surviving and thriving

Dan Bobinski

Such is the pace of change today that every day seems to present new challenges and opportunities. So how managers adapt to the changing horizon can make the difference between surviving or thriving.

How regret can be your friend

Manfred Kets De Vries

All of us have made poor choices that we regretted later and felt disappointment or sorrow at what could have been. But regret shouldn’t be seen as a negative - when managed properly, it is a very useful decision-making tool.

Win the war for talent by embracing employee feedback

Jim Barnett

What keeps people excited about coming to work every day isn’t perks or gimmicks, but a sense of purpose. So one of the key jobs as a leader is to foster and maintain this feeling every day of the week.

Why every company is a software company

Rod Collins

Rather than tapes or CDs, most music is now consumed digitally. In other words, music is software. And this is only one of countless examples of software-based platforms replacing physical products as the foundation for sustainable competitive advantage.

From the archive

Morale: a moving target

Duane Dike

What we think we know about morale is probably wrong, especially the black and white notion that morale is either ‘good’ or ‘bad’. Like most human feelings, morale is a moving target, which is why being sensitive to its nuances is such a key skill for leaders.

David Livermore

Compliments and cultural intelligence

David Livermore

The giving and receiving of "compliments" is a classic example of leadership mantras falling short when mindlessly applied to all cultures.

Philip Whiteley

Sustainability: ignoring the obvious

Philip Whiteley

Our 'left-right' political beliefs and parties are doing nothing to address the most important challenges we face. In fact, they're about as obsolete as the religious factions that tore Europe apart in the 16th and 17th centuries.

Wayne Turmel

10 new workplace survival skills

Wayne Turmel

A new report has suggested 10 skills we'll all need to thrive in the workplace of 2020. But I'd argue that we are going to need them much, much sooner than that.

Max McKeown

Reinventing the wheel

Max McKeown

It's easy to think that something is so simple that you couldn't improve it or so low-tech your intellect would be wasted even thinking about it. But you'd be wrong. Because anything that is invented can - and often should - be reinvented.

Earlier opinion

Social media: how did we get here?

Rod Collins

One of the great ironies of the digital revolution is the environment of toxic tribalism that has been enabled by social media and the collective unconscious blindness it has brought with it.

Three lessons in crisis leadership

Piyumi Kapugeekiyana

There’s no one-size-fits-all approach to crisis management. But studying examples of crises that have been handled well can teach us some very valuable coping mechanisms that could help avoid a crisis turning into a disaster.

Emotional intelligence doesn't translate

David Livermore

Emotions are universal. But the ways in which different cultures express them are not. So what’s considered appropriate in one culture could get you in trouble if blindly applied to colleagues and friends elsewhere.

Do you run meetings or lead them?

Wayne Turmel

Any meeting, whether in a conference room or online, can be run. But successful meetings need to be led - and there is a huge difference between running a meeting and leading one.

New ways of thinking and acting

Rod Collins

For more than a century, the basic formula of management has been “plan and control.” But today this no longer works because strategies are no longer planned, they’re discovered. So the new formula for business should be “explore, experiment and execute”.

Get out of the way!

Duane Dike

What kinds of things get in the way of productivity? There are no simple answers, but the one thing we can say is that barriers are almost always by-products of the destructive attitudes and behaviors of leaders.

The key to cultivating agility in decision making

Marc Le Menestrel

Decision-making excellence requires self-awareness and the ability to choose how to think in different situations. That's why being able to understand different perspectives is such a crucial skill for today’s business leaders.

Five reasons remote teams fail

Wayne Turmel

Leading a remote team isn’t that different to leading a co-located one. But we do have to re-think how we do certain things. Here are five ways you can get that wrong.

From strategic planning to strategic discovery

Rod Collins

In today’s world, strategic planning based on the extrapolation of historical trends is a futile exercise. Instead, staying ahead of disruptive change depends on harnessing the power of collective intelligence.

Disaster equals energy plus misinformation

Janet Howd

In his seminal book on accidents and disasters, Barry A Turner observed that disasters almost always represent failures of intention and that a simple equation - “disaster equals energy plus misinformation” - can to help guard against catastrophic events.

Are you hiding behind technology?

Wayne Turmel

We all get tired, rushed and overworked. And when we do, it's tempting to use technology as an excuse to take the easy way out by avoiding confrontation or uncomfortable conversations.

On culture

Duane Dike

Cultures are complicated things: they tend to break down to innumerable sub-cultures like concentric rings. But that doesn’t stop us embracing simplistic cultural stereotypes, be they about nations or organizations.