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Are your teammates competent?

Wayne Turmel

One of the biggest factors in building trust is believing in the competence of the people you work with. If you work in the same place, that isn’t so hard to do. But if you work remotely, gathering evidence of competence takes more effort.

The essential challenge in times of great change

Rod Collins

In times of great change, business leaders can’t look to the past for guidance. Instead, they need to proactively manage the evolution of their companies and be prepared to innovate when markets shift.

What happens to firms that don’t adopt dominant technologies?

Nathan Furr

Firms that choose the non-dominant technology in an industry shakeout aren’t necessarily dooming themselves to extinction. Remaining open to options is an important part of innovation and they can still pivot, adapt and survive.

The cost of bad meetings

Wayne Turmel

Bad meetings cost companies billions of dollars every year. But this waste is easily avoidable if only we'd all ask ourselves a couple of basic questions and think a little more about how and why we have meetings.

The cure for the loneliness of command

Manfred Kets De Vries

‘It’s lonely at the top’ is an old cliché, but for many top executives, it’s a harsh reality. Too often, though, this loneliness goes unaddressed as executives try instead to keep up a hero facade.

The transformational leap in healthcare

Rod Collins

Healthcare systems are designed to leverage the individual intelligence of the physician. But that’s all about to change as digitization radically changes the basic rules about the entire healthcare model operates.

Staying on track isn't easy

Wayne Turmel

It's surprising how often teams lose sight of their goals. There are plenty of reasons, and maybe understanding some of the most common will help you and your team reassess where you are headed.

Engaging change: six tips for surviving and thriving

Dan Bobinski

Such is the pace of change today that every day seems to present new challenges and opportunities. So how managers adapt to the changing horizon can make the difference between surviving or thriving.

How regret can be your friend

Manfred Kets De Vries

All of us have made poor choices that we regretted later and felt disappointment or sorrow at what could have been. But regret shouldn’t be seen as a negative - when managed properly, it is a very useful decision-making tool.

Win the war for talent by embracing employee feedback

Jim Barnett

What keeps people excited about coming to work every day isn’t perks or gimmicks, but a sense of purpose. So one of the key jobs as a leader is to foster and maintain this feeling every day of the week.

On culture

Duane Dike

Cultures are complicated things: they tend to break down to innumerable sub-cultures like concentric rings. But that doesn’t stop us embracing simplistic cultural stereotypes, be they about nations or organizations.

Is your organisation a cult?

Manfred Kets De Vries

Many businesses display cult-like characteristics, offering a form of meaning, purpose and belonging but demanding strict adherence to their set of beliefs and swiftly punishing or ostracising those who don’t conform.

Compassion

Duane Dike

Compassion is not typically revered in the corporate world. Bosses are simply supposed to get things done. But if they're not careful, they can become impersonal, non-compassionate and ultimately, non-human.

Social media: how did we get here?

Rod Collins

One of the great ironies of the digital revolution is the environment of toxic tribalism that has been enabled by social media and the collective unconscious blindness it has brought with it.

Three lessons in crisis leadership

Piyumi Kapugeekiyana

There’s no one-size-fits-all approach to crisis management. But studying examples of crises that have been handled well can teach us some very valuable coping mechanisms that could help avoid a crisis turning into a disaster.

Emotional intelligence doesn't translate

David Livermore

Emotions are universal. But the ways in which different cultures express them are not. So what’s considered appropriate in one culture could get you in trouble if blindly applied to colleagues and friends elsewhere.

Do you run meetings or lead them?

Wayne Turmel

Any meeting, whether in a conference room or online, can be run. But successful meetings need to be led - and there is a huge difference between running a meeting and leading one.

New ways of thinking and acting

Rod Collins

For more than a century, the basic formula of management has been “plan and control.” But today this no longer works because strategies are no longer planned, they’re discovered. So the new formula for business should be “explore, experiment and execute”.

Get out of the way!

Duane Dike

What kinds of things get in the way of productivity? There are no simple answers, but the one thing we can say is that barriers are almost always by-products of the destructive attitudes and behaviors of leaders.

The key to cultivating agility in decision making

Marc Le Menestrel

Decision-making excellence requires self-awareness and the ability to choose how to think in different situations. That's why being able to understand different perspectives is such a crucial skill for today’s business leaders.

Five reasons remote teams fail

Wayne Turmel

Leading a remote team isn’t that different to leading a co-located one. But we do have to re-think how we do certain things. Here are five ways you can get that wrong.

And some more

From strategic planning to strategic discovery

Rod Collins

In today’s world, strategic planning based on the extrapolation of historical trends is a futile exercise. Instead, staying ahead of disruptive change depends on harnessing the power of collective intelligence.

Disaster equals energy plus misinformation

Janet Howd

In his seminal book on accidents and disasters, Barry A Turner observed that disasters almost always represent failures of intention and that a simple equation - “disaster equals energy plus misinformation” - can to help guard against catastrophic events.

Are you hiding behind technology?

Wayne Turmel

We all get tired, rushed and overworked. And when we do, it's tempting to use technology as an excuse to take the easy way out by avoiding confrontation or uncomfortable conversations.

On culture

Duane Dike

Cultures are complicated things: they tend to break down to innumerable sub-cultures like concentric rings. But that doesn’t stop us embracing simplistic cultural stereotypes, be they about nations or organizations.

Swerve and swarm

Max McKeown

You want to know the secret to winning in an age of uncertainty? It's to keep your future open. Planning never guarantees success. Only adaptation guarantees success. Success comes from being confident in your human ability to see opportunity, understand opportunity and grab opportunities.

Why power seekers give advice

Li Huang

Giving advice makes some people feel powerful because they feel that they have influence over others. But that connection with power means that it can also be dangerous.

Earning attention on webinars

Wayne Turmel

I’m always being asked how to get people to pay attention during webinars. My answer is to ask a simple question: what are you doing to earn their attention?

The dual company

Rod Collins

In today’s world, strategic plans and once-successful business models can quickly become redundant. So how can companies sustain short-term profitability while building long-term innovation capability? One answer is to create a dual company.

I think, therefore I feel

Duane Dike

How many of us have said, “I’ve been so busy today I haven’t even had time to think?” If you haven’t had time to think, you haven’t had time to lead. Leading without thinking is leading into disaster.

And still more...

Ask your team a 3,000 year-old question

Wayne Turmel

If you're mindful as to your meeting's purpose and desired outcome, you will accomplish far more than if you approach it as an empty ritual.

Culture fit vs. authenticity

David Livermore

Authenticity - being yourself - can sometimes collide with organizational values. So how far should any of us be expected to give up our authentic preferences for the sake of an organizational purpose?

Nine habits that build trust

John Blakey

There’s a lot more to trust than just delivering on your promises. In fact, doing what you say you will do is only the basic entry-level requirement if you want to inspire trust in those you lead.

Managing risks in a hyper-connected world

Rod Collins

As we all know, risk is a fact of life. But as the world becomes more connected, new risks have emerged that demand new tools to mitigate them and to thwart a new generation of threats.

What can be done about bullies at work?

Manfred Kets De Vries

Workplace bullying is a silent epidemic that causes a host of psychological and physical health problems. So why is addressing the problem and stamping out bullying such an uphill battle for everyone involved?

The mortar in a project's wall

Wayne Turmel

What holds a wall together is the mortar between the bricks. And what holds a project together is the effective, clear and proactive communication between individuals.

Shut up first, talk later

Wayne Turmel

On team conference calls, it can sometimes seem almost impossible to get people to contribute or share information effectively. Here’s how you can change that.

10 characteristics of customer-focused businesses

Andy Hanselman

Customer-focused organisations are dramatically and demonstrably different from their competitors. They don’t just meet customer expectations, they consistently try to exceed them in everything they do.

Why change? Why not?

Duane Dike

Change often fails because it is based on a plan/do model. We plan, and then expect people to do. But that ignores the exploration, thinking, mistaking, learning, testing and struggling that needs to come in between.

Accountability is more important than accounting

Wayne Turmel

What's more important: that people are working on exactly what you want them working on at that exact moment, or that important tasks and outputs are done on time and team goals are met?

Are you addicted to power?

Manfred Kets De Vries

In democracies, a free press and the separation of powers reduce the risk of leaders becoming power addicts. But most businesses concentrate power at the top, a design that all too easily leads to power intoxication.

Leaders, go away!

Duane Dike

Too many bosses fail to understand that every individual thinks and works at different rates or that we all need to distinguish between important and not so important work to operate effectively.