Work-life balance, not just cash, is what counts in battle to keep staff

2005

Offering more flexible working hours is just as likely to persuade workers stay as throwing money at them, according to a survey.

The poll of 250 employees found most would consider moving to a new job if their working week became more flexible.

Their average working week was a “burdensome” 49 hours, and three out of four said they would be prepared to sacrifice money for a better work-life balance.

Many were worried that long hours were damaging relationships with their partner.

“This survey reveals that the margin between the appeal of flexible working and more money is a lot narrower than many employers assume,” said Geraint Evans of consultancy Woodhurst, which carried out the study.

“The message is clear - offering your staff more flexibility in how they work, can be as effective a retention strategy as throwing money at the problem,” he added.