Turning around a dysfunctional team

Matt Jenkins | 27 Jun 2017

Bringing together a group of smart, creative and driven people doesn’t mean they’ll instantly work in sync. In fact, three-quarters of cross-functional teams are dysfunctional in one way or another. Here are some ways to address that.

What every company should learn from United Airlines

Rod Collins

In a hyper-connected world, everyone in an organization should remember they work for their customers, not their bosses. Companies never go out of business because they lose their bosses. They only disappear when they lose their customers.

Developing a digital mindset

Rohit Talwar

How can a business succeed online when 'online' appears to be changing by the day? What do we need to do tomorrow? How much should we be spending? What if we get it wrong? The place to start is by developing a digital mindset.

The two big communication questions

Wayne Turmel

Communication increasingly seems to be a question of technology. But it isn’t. It's a complicated process with lots of moving parts. And it starts with two very important questions

So you're a manager. Now what?

Dan Bobinski

As managers, we can either choose to value and develop our team members or we can look for ways to elevate our own stature. Do you know which category you fall into?

A time for every season

Duane Dike

In too many organizations, older workers get written off ‘village idiots’. But that’s a big mistake - after all these are the people who know its history, remember how things used to be and know what works and what doesn’t.

Why holacracy may not work for extraverts

Rod Collins

For all its good intentions, holacracy has a fatal flaw. It is a system designed for introverts that leaves extraverts isolated and frustrated at what feels like tedious and lifeless interaction.

From the archive

Morale: a moving target

Duane Dike

What we think we know about morale is probably wrong, especially the black and white notion that morale is either ‘good’ or ‘bad’. Like most human feelings, morale is a moving target, which is why being sensitive to its nuances is such a key skill for leaders.

Bill Fischer

Shanghai: forging the future?

Bill Fischer

The gala opening of the Shanghai Expo has focused the world's attention on this vibrant city that - or so we are told - is "forging the future". But while one can't doubt Shanghai's size and vibrancy, it's potential impact on the future is much more of a moot point.

John Girard

Learning from millennials: four lessons from life afloat

John Girard

I recently sailed around the world with about 600 college students. As a baby boomer, it was an illuminating experience, not least because I discovered that most of the stereotypes my generation has about millennials are simply not true.

Dan Bobinski

A better way to fire someone?

Dan Bobinski

In a well-managed organization, firing someone should never (with the exception of deal-breakers such as theft and violence) be a surprise event. A termination meeting should be a logical conclusion to a series of efforts to correct unwanted or unproductive behavior. And it should never be done over the phone (are you listening, Yahoo?).

Peter Taylor

Jeepers Batman, it's projects as usual!

Peter Taylor

Do you remember the original Batman TV series and the cartoon fistfights with villains like the Joker, the Penguin and the Mad Hatter? Believe it or not, this does have some bearing on the future of project management!

Dan Bobinski

What does it mean to put someone on probation?

Dan Bobinski

Being a manager carries a lot of responsibilities and putting someone on probation is a huge deal. But the outcome of that choice is more on your shoulders than you may realize. Because it's the manager's job to find a way to help a problem employee, not the other way round.

Earlier opinion

Should we judge?

Duane Dike

Making assumptions about others is a risky business. We don’t know their lives. We don’t know their happiness or their loneliness. We don’t know how they confront their issues. So why not converse? Enjoy it while you can, then move on when the environment changes.

Why people don't want your new idea (and how to change that)

Jurgen Wolff

If you come up with a new idea, more often than not you'll meet tremendous resistance. So here are some strategies to disarm the idea-killers, neutralize the objections and get your ideas taken seriously.

Rethinking resilience in global supply chains

Karan Girotra

The increasingly complex nature of supply chains carries an increased risk of costly disruptions. But attempts to mitigate risk by diversifying may make supply chain disruptions more damaging when they occur.

The aggregation of marginal decays

John Blakey

Losing your integrity is like losing your virginity: it only happens once. And it often stems from a step-by-step deterioration, when small errors and failings are routinely overlooked - the exact opposite of marginal gains.

A glimpse into the future of work

Rod Collins

Forget technical challenges. The most important issue we face in a digitally transformed world is finding new ways to create economic value for those whose jobs are eliminated by digital automation.

Reacting vs responding

Wayne Turmel

Ever hit “reply all” when you probably shouldn’t? Do you interrupt what you're doing to read incoming emails? Too often, we react rather than respond. And that can lead to trouble, especially for managers.

Confidence boosters for women in business

Abi Eniola

Studies show the majority of women believe confidence is key to effective leadership, but it’s something they struggle with throughout their careers. So what can they do to enhance their presence at senior levels?

Taking time for leadership

Duane Dike

Reflection is an essential part of leadership. Leaders who don't pause to reflect run into trouble because off-the-cuff decisions are often irrational, people-less, system-ignorant choices. In contrast, reflection brings new alternatives, fresh perspectives and creative solutions.

Every workplace needs a fool

Manfred Kets De Vries

Office tricksters tell it like it is and contribute to creative growth. But just as a king’s fool would play with fire if he told the king an unpleasant truths, fools and tricksters should tread warily in organisational life.

Productive conversations to build cultural intelligence

David Livermore

How do we engage in productive dialogue with people who have very different perspectives from our own? The many conversations I’ve had since the U.S. election have given me some ideas.

The right way to brag

Duane Dike

When you’re a manager, bragging about others is good. But bragging about yourself is bad, especially when it involves taking the credit for things other people have done in order to get ahead.

Essential attributes of successful women leaders

Cindy Wahler

Almost all the successful career women who have achieved a seat at the top table have applied their business savvy in two strategic ways that help to position them as leaders who truly makes a mark.