Hire for how they learn, not what they know

Max McKeown | 11 Oct 2017

Learning new things is at the heart of innovation. That's why how a person learns is far more important than what they know. So you need to hire people not for what they know now, but because they can adapt to the future.

The bad influence of aggressive bosses

Manfred Kets De Vries

Identifying with an aggressor is a basic strategy for human survival. But in the workplace, such behaviour is destructive and needs to be called out.

Words of mass disruption

Janet Howd

Unless we can start to discern truth from falsehood, the slow but persistent infiltration of spurious news will inevitably lead humanity down the road of serious physical consequences.

Learning is everywhere

Wayne Turmel

What you know now is good for now, but might be completely outdated by tomorrow. This means there's a constant need to learn new things - both formally and - increasingly - informally.

Digital transformation and the power of collective intelligence

Rod Collins

As hierarchies give way to networks in our digital future, we need to understand how collective intelligence works and how to harness it - as well as how to protect ourselves from its dark side.

Old dogs, new ideas

Duane Dike

It's no surprise that beginners learn quickly. But the idea that you can’t teach an old dog new tricks is terribly wrong. The age of that old dog does not determine his or her ability to learn.

Adaptive strain, adaptive change

Peter Vajda

People are often the greatest barrier to change, but without them, change can't happen. So handling the effect that change has on individuals is what really determines its success or failure.

From the archive

Morale: a moving target

Duane Dike

What we think we know about morale is probably wrong, especially the black and white notion that morale is either ‘good’ or ‘bad’. Like most human feelings, morale is a moving target, which is why being sensitive to its nuances is such a key skill for leaders.

Dan Bobinski

Keys to capitalising on feedback

Dan Bobinski

It costs much less to keep an existing customer than it does to acquire a new one. So you would think that acutely listening to customer needs is paramount for all companies, right?

Peter Vajda

The voices of fear, doubt and mistrust

Peter Vajda

Mistrust is a fact of life in many workplaces. But mistrust is brought to the workplace - it doesn't originate there. Mistrust in the workplace is a consequence, often unintended, of perceiving others through the lens of the child they once were.

Dan Bobinski

Most workplaces are unprepared for terrorism

Dan Bobinski

When it comes to keeping employees safe in the face of a major disaster and/or terrorist action, most workplaces are woefully unprepared. So what should we be planning for?

Neil Cassie

The new language of leadership

Neil Cassie

A profound shift is taking place from predictive to non-predictive demand – from push to pull economics. And if organisations are to adapt to this, their leaders need to radically reassess their behaviour.

Earlier opinion

It's the little things, stupid

Wayne Turmel

For most of us, the big things - like the global economy - are out of our control. So let's turn off the news for a while and focus on the little things that happen at work that make so many managers lives far more complicated than they need to be.

Nobody is smarter or faster than everybody

Rod Collins

The myth of the individual hero is just that: a myth. The smartest organizations aren't those with the smartest elite individuals, but those that understand that their most valuable asset is the collective intelligence of their people.

We all need proper vacations

Peter Vajda

We've said it before and we'll say it again. Everyone needs a proper holiday. Taking real time out from work is a non-negotiable necessity if we're to to maintain a healthy mind, body and soul.

Strategic change is all in the timing

Quy Huy

Large organisations have many different heartbeats, and change managers need to listen to them all in order to align the pace and rhythm of their change intervention with their desired outcomes.

Everyday leadership

Duane Dike

Over the years, I’ve lost count of the number of leadership theories and styles that I’ve studied, practiced and discarded. What all this has taught me is that leadership is a complicated puzzle - and that the best solution is to keep things simple.

Don't use technology as an excuse for bad management

Wayne Turmel

When it comes to managing a remote team, technology is not a communication problem. So stop blaming the tools if you chose the wrong one for the wrong reason.

The truth about change

Peter Vajda

The reason change so often fails is that we resist letting go of old ideas and beliefs. But you cannot change and remain the same. Change means the letting go of the old and encouraging something new to develop. And that's as true for organizations as it is for individuals.

Why wisdom can't be taught

Manfred Kets De Vries

Intelligence and wisdom are quite different things. But while wisdom requires education, education does not necessarily make people wise. So how can we expedite the road to wisdom?

Turning around a dysfunctional team

Matt Jenkins

Bringing together a group of smart, creative and driven people doesn’t mean they’ll instantly work in sync. In fact, three-quarters of cross-functional teams are dysfunctional in one way or another. Here are some ways to address that.

What every company should learn from United Airlines

Rod Collins

In a hyper-connected world, everyone in an organization should remember they work for their customers, not their bosses. Companies never go out of business because they lose their bosses. They only disappear when they lose their customers.

Developing a digital mindset

Rohit Talwar

How can a business succeed online when 'online' appears to be changing by the day? What do we need to do tomorrow? How much should we be spending? What if we get it wrong? The place to start is by developing a digital mindset.

The two big communication questions

Wayne Turmel

Communication increasingly seems to be a question of technology. But it isn’t. It's a complicated process with lots of moving parts. And it starts with two very important questions