Corporate heaven: the authentizotic organisation

Manfred Kets De Vries | 14 Dec 2017

We hear a lot about ‘purpose’ and ‘meaning’, but how can we create organisations where people find meaning in, and are captivated by, their work?

A whole new ballgame?

Wayne Turmel

Adopting remote teams might seem like a whole new ball game, but it’s the same game - just played on a slightly different field. The WHAT doesn’t really change, it's the HOW that's different.

Is communication the problem, or teamwork?

James M. Kerr

Sometimes we can get fooled into thinking that poor communication is a problem when it’s really a symptom of something much more profound: poor organizational design that undermines the ability of people to work in teams.

Digital transformation or digital destruction?

Rod Collins

Two fundamental issues need to be addressed if we want to avoid digital transformation going wrong and turning into digital destruction.

The biggest source of conflict on diverse teams

David Livermore

Clashing expectations are the main source of conflict in almost any relationship. And nowhere is that more true than on diverse teams, where intercultural challenges mean that the potential for misalignment is even greater.

Your team members aren’t pawns in a chess game

Wayne Turmel

Project management and team leadership are often viewed as chess games. But there’s one important difference. Those pieces on the chess board aren’t human. Your team members are - and they need to be treated accordingly.

Intelligence?

Duane Dike

What exactly is intelligence? Is it something measured by an IQ test? Or should we also consider more subtle traits like humor, the ability to figure things out or storytelling?

From the archive

Morale: a moving target

Duane Dike

What we think we know about morale is probably wrong, especially the black and white notion that morale is either ‘good’ or ‘bad’. Like most human feelings, morale is a moving target, which is why being sensitive to its nuances is such a key skill for leaders.

Max McKeown

Crash, sell, opportunity?

Max McKeown

Knowing the weaknesses of your opponents is clearly advantageous. To use a tennis analogy, you might remember Sharapova focusing on Serena William's, relatively, weak forehand to clinch the 2004 Wimbledon final.

David Livermore

Don't treat your customers the way you want to be treated

David Livermore

Yes. You heard us right. Because 'customer service' can mean different things to different people. So what might seem like good customer service when viewed from one cultural perspective can actually be harmful in another.

Bill Ford

Don't let them grind you down

Bill Ford

Here in London we have had a lot of shocks over the last few weeks and we don't know if it is over. Many of us are trying to return to normal, but how can we start to concentrate on work and living again?

Xiaowei Rose Luo

Are women's leadership assumptions holding them back?

Xiaowei Rose Luo

There has been a lot of discussion about the stereotypes contributing to the lack of women in the c-suite. But one of the biggest obstacles could be their own assumptions about the path they’re supposed to take.

Earlier opinion

How automation will rescue middle management

Quy Huy

Far from fearing the rise of AI, we should view automation as an opportunity to liberate managers to focus on things that AI can’t emulate - emotion and empathy.

Five simple, curmudgeonly email rules

Wayne Turmel

Many things in life are necessary but annoying - especially email. So here are five simple things everyone can do with their emails that will help make everyone less generally cranky:

Confessions of an ENFP lion-otter hybrid

Wayne Turmel

I have officially taken every personality profile known to man. Other than telling me that I'm an ENFP, Independent-Working Blue-Green Lion-Otter hybrid, the one thing they have in common is unanimous agreement that I DO have a personality.

Employing outsiders: a survival guide

Robert Kelsey

Outsiders can be a manager's worst nightmare. But misfits don't have to be disruptive workplace mavericks. Most are creative, crafty and brave. So rather than try to get rid of them, here’s how to understand what makes them tick and harness their talents.

Charlottesville, Google, and why some need CQ more than others

David Livermore

Cultural intelligence is about how the 7 billion human beings on this planet get along together. So whether it's at home or at work, we all need CQ. But some of us need it much more than others.

Why empathy makes for stronger organisations

Manfred Kets De Vries

The ability of executives to see themselves from the outside and others from the inside, plays an important role in effective team formation.

Horizontal leadership and the spaces in between

Michael Jones

Horizontal leaders don’t just think outside the box, they think outside the building, seeking answers and opportunities in the ill-defined, ambiguous spaces at the boundaries of sectors, disciplines and capabilities.

Getting virtual meetings to start on time

Wayne Turmel

Why do webmeetings always seem to start late? While there’s no silver bullet that will solve the problem, there are some simple things you can do to help your odds of starting (and finishing) on time.

Ideas are fragile (handle with care)

Max McKeown

Which kind of ideas culture do you have? If someone in your organisation has an idea, is it welcomed? Or has hierarchy and history conspired to disconnect the part that thinks from the part that does, making innovation impossible?

Leadership, innovation and the future

Duane Dike

Leaders are critical to innovative thinking. Great ideas don't emerge from companies whose leaders try to control and micromanage. Innovation only thrives in organizations whose members are free to think and express themselves.

Quantum physics and quarky behavior

Kieran Hearty

If you want to understand some of the less acceptable aspects of human nature the answer may lie in quantum physics. And the same ‘quarkiness’ that explains bad behavior can also be used to energize and motivate those around us.

It's the little things, stupid

Wayne Turmel

For most of us, the big things - like the global economy - are out of our control. So let's turn off the news for a while and focus on the little things that happen at work that make so many managers lives far more complicated than they need to be.