Dealing with a space invader

John McLachlan | 18 Jan 2017

We all know them. They’re the space invaders, the people who waste your time at work, ignore your boundaries and make you feel uncomfortable. But how do you spot one - and how do you deal with them?

The second wave of the digital revolution

Rod Collins

Thanks to the internet, we have experienced more change in the past 16 years than in the previous five decades of the last century. But that's nothing compared to what the second wave of the digital revolution will bring.

Meaning what we say?

Janet Howd

An unintended consequence of the aftermath of the deregulation of the financial markets in the late 1980s was the deregulation of once-powerful words that has stripped them of much of their impact.

Resolutions and the blame game

Peter Vajda

This year, as every year, 98 per cent of those who make New Year's resolutions will have given up or failed by Valentine's Day. One of the main reasons for this is that we're stuck in a victim mentality that stops us following through on our intentions.

Five remote team new year's resolutions

Wayne Turmel

The new year is a great time to ask some fundamental questions about how your project team works together and what needs to change. So here are five "new year's resolutions" you should at least consider for your remote team.

The magic of festival

Michael Jones

As we enter into this festive time of year, its worth remembering that Festival often comes during times of great disruption - a surge of energy so strong that it acts as a counterpoint to the world of official and hierarchical order.

Time for change

Duane Dike

Change is the basis of renewal. So even altering the way we approach some mundane task or activity can make life better and help us to think differently. A little change can make our world that much better.

From the archive

Morale: a moving target

Duane Dike

What we think we know about morale is probably wrong, especially the black and white notion that morale is either ‘good’ or ‘bad’. Like most human feelings, morale is a moving target, which is why being sensitive to its nuances is such a key skill for leaders.

Andy Hanselman

Fish in a different pond

Andy Hanselman

If you always do what you've always done, you'll always get what you've always had. That why you need to start thinking and doing differently if you want to generate any real innovation.

Bob Selden

What's in a name?

Bob Selden

Not all business-speak is jargon – some of it can even be useful. The trouble is, there's so much nonsense spoken in workplaces these days that it's easy for valuable concepts to be tarred with the "office-speak" brush.

Wayne Turmel

Leading a team is about them, not you

Wayne Turmel

Influencing people and getting them onboard has very little to do with what you want and everything to do with them. If they don't see why they should cooperate, they won't. If they see why they should want to help you, you can hardly stop them.

Wayne Turmel

Telling isn't training

Wayne Turmel

When you tell someone something, they might intellectually understand what you want, but there's no guarantee they can perform the skill involved. That takes real training.

Janet Howd

Flat is the new rotund

Janet Howd

When I seriously started considering how a flattening global society could possibly work, it dawned on me that mankind has always defined and shared knowledge on a horizontal plane.

Earlier opinion

Encouraging others to do what you want

Val Nichols

Having a job title doesn’t make you a leader. If you want other people to follow you, you first have to enlist their support. And that means that you need to build your influencing skills.

Root cause problem-solving

Peter Vajda

For many years, the Japanese have approached the process of problem- solving with a strategy known as "the Five Whys". Peter Vajda explores how this helps us find better solutions.

You can't take the practice out of presenting

Janet Howd

Our fear of giving a presentation often means we perform well below par. But running a marathon scares people too, yet those who try it usually perform well. Why should that be?

Would you follow you?

Val Nichols

If you want to be a leader, a good place to start is by considering what convinces you to follow someone else. The chances are that the factors that carry the greatest weight are ones to do with trust.

Strategic planning must change with the times

Mark Heffner

Effective strategic planning and execution can do much to improve competitive advantage and value. But it has done right if it is going to fit with today’s rough and tumble world.

The accountability dilemma

Duane Dike

It’s all very well being held responsible and accountable as a manager, but that can only work if you’re also able to make real and meaningful decisions. Yet all too often, that decision-making lives with other people.

Is hierarchy really necessary?

Rod Collins

Throughout human history, hierarchy has been a near-universal model for organizing the work of large numbers of people. But as the world is transformed by hyper-connectivity, are self-organized networks a more appropriate organizational design solution?

Workplace excellence can be contagious

Serguei Netessine

Team performance can often be more, or less, than the sum of the parts. So it’s significant that research has demonstrated that collective outcomes soar when top performers mingle with less adept colleagues.

North America's accent problem

Wayne Turmel

As a Canadian who spends a lot of time on international conference calls and webinars, it's impossible not to notice that almost everyone can deal with foreign accents except (North) Americans.

Choosing to be humble

John Blakey

The sad story of ‘Big Sam’ Allardyce, the shortest-serving manager in English football history, is a classic example of someone falling foul of habit No.6 of a trusted executive - choosing to be humble.

Feelings vs reasoning

Duane Dike

The older I get, the more I see that rather than ignoring people’s expressions of feeling, managers ought to welcome them as good for business and realize that results can improve when you listen and respond appropriately to them.

Fish in a different pond

Andy Hanselman

If you always do what you've always done, you'll always get what you've always had. That why you need to start thinking and doing differently if you want to generate any real innovation.