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The aggregation of marginal decays

John Blakey

Losing your integrity is like losing your virginity: it only happens once. And it often stems from a step-by-step deterioration, when small errors and failings are routinely overlooked - the exact opposite of marginal gains.

A glimpse into the future of work

Rod Collins

Forget technical challenges. The most important issue we face in a digitally transformed world is finding new ways to create economic value for those whose jobs are eliminated by digital automation.

Reacting vs responding

Wayne Turmel

Ever hit “reply all” when you probably shouldn’t? Do you interrupt what you're doing to read incoming emails? Too often, we react rather than respond. And that can lead to trouble, especially for managers.

Confidence boosters for women in business

Abi Eniola

Studies show the majority of women believe confidence is key to effective leadership, but it’s something they struggle with throughout their careers. So what can they do to enhance their presence at senior levels?

Taking time for leadership

Duane Dike

Reflection is an essential part of leadership. Leaders who don't pause to reflect run into trouble because off-the-cuff decisions are often irrational, people-less, system-ignorant choices. In contrast, reflection brings new alternatives, fresh perspectives and creative solutions.

Every workplace needs a fool

Manfred Kets De Vries

Office tricksters tell it like it is and contribute to creative growth. But just as a king’s fool would play with fire if he told the king an unpleasant truths, fools and tricksters should tread warily in organisational life.

Productive conversations to build cultural intelligence

David Livermore

How do we engage in productive dialogue with people who have very different perspectives from our own? The many conversations I’ve had since the U.S. election have given me some ideas.

The right way to brag

Duane Dike

When you’re a manager, bragging about others is good. But bragging about yourself is bad, especially when it involves taking the credit for things other people have done in order to get ahead.

Essential attributes of successful women leaders

Cindy Wahler

Almost all the successful career women who have achieved a seat at the top table have applied their business savvy in two strategic ways that help to position them as leaders who truly makes a mark.

How to take expert advice

Wayne Turmel

You could drive yourself crazy trying to follow every piece of advice you get. And often the experts disagree. So how is a rational, intelligent and diligent human supposed to take all this advice without their craniums imploding?

Not negotiable! Why business must negotiate more effectively

Tony Hughes

Most people, in most circumstances, negotiate badly, most of the time. But negotiation skills can be learned. Here's how to negotiate more effectively, whatever the shape or size of your organisation.

Time for change

Duane Dike

Change is the basis of renewal. So even altering the way we approach some mundane task or activity can make life better and help us to think differently. A little change can make our world that much better.

The agile dilemma: mindset or method?

Rod Collins

There’s an intriguing dialogue happening in the world of Agile software development that may be relevant for anyone interested in how business works in a rapidly changing world.

Emotional differences across cultures

David Livermore

Different cultures appear to have very different ways of showing emotion and managing feelings. But in reality we all have much more in common than meets the eye when it comes to how we handle some key human emotions.

Your voice and your identity

Janet Howd

Technology has made it possible to identify anyone by their unique voice pattern within about three seconds. That has some interesting implications - for good and for ill.

Are remote workers less loyal?

Wayne Turmel

Remote and virtual workers leave their jobs at a slightly higher rate than those who work in a fixed location. Are they simply ungrateful weasels, or can something else explain this increase in turnover?

Changing a culture starts with changing behaviours

Stephen Fortune

Time and time again, companies invest huge amounts of time and money in the launch of new initiatives. But after the initial excitement wears off, nothing changes. Why? It's all about behaviour.

So what went wrong?

Duane Dike

Even in the high inflation years of the early 1980s, jobs were relatively secure. Not any more. Now when things go wrong in a business, the axe almost always falls swiftly on the people who do the work, and very rarely on the executives who made bad decisions.

Not negotiable! Why business must negotiate more effectively

Tony Hughes

Most people, in most circumstances, negotiate badly, most of the time. But negotiation skills can be learned. Here's how to negotiate more effectively, whatever the shape or size of your organisation.

The harmful effects of workplace incivility

Quy Huy

Far from being trivial, incivility and low-level unpleasantness in the workplace can have disastrous results. But managers can - and should - do something about it.

How the best company to work for works

Rod Collins

The companies that populate the lists of the best companies to work for all share one thing: they understand that culture as the most important ingredient of their business success.

And some more

Leadership and the power of the imagination

Michael Jones

At the core of our existence is a pool of energy that has very little to do with personal identity. This is the world of the imagination, a world in which we play only a small part in the whole marvellous act of creation.

Human Rights: do the diligence

Robert McCorquodale

The need for companies across all industry sectors to do genuine, focused human rights due diligence is becoming ever clearer. This applies both to a company’s own direct activities and within its supply chain.

Weird, rude, or different?

David Livermore

Cross-cultural encounters can sometime be very awkward. Here are a few suggestions for a culturally intelligent way to respond to those difficult cross-cultural situations.

Encouraging others to do what you want

Val Nichols

Having a job title doesn’t make you a leader. If you want other people to follow you, you first have to enlist their support. And that means that you need to build your influencing skills.

Root cause problem-solving

Peter Vajda

For many years, the Japanese have approached the process of problem- solving with a strategy known as "the Five Whys". Peter Vajda explores how this helps us find better solutions.

You can't take the practice out of presenting

Janet Howd

Our fear of giving a presentation often means we perform well below par. But running a marathon scares people too, yet those who try it usually perform well. Why should that be?

Would you follow you?

Val Nichols

If you want to be a leader, a good place to start is by considering what convinces you to follow someone else. The chances are that the factors that carry the greatest weight are ones to do with trust.

Strategic planning must change with the times

Mark Heffner

Effective strategic planning and execution can do much to improve competitive advantage and value. But it has done right if it is going to fit with today’s rough and tumble world.

The accountability dilemma

Duane Dike

It’s all very well being held responsible and accountable as a manager, but that can only work if you’re also able to make real and meaningful decisions. Yet all too often, that decision-making lives with other people.

And still more...

Is hierarchy really necessary?

Rod Collins

Throughout human history, hierarchy has been a near-universal model for organizing the work of large numbers of people. But as the world is transformed by hyper-connectivity, are self-organized networks a more appropriate organizational design solution?

Workplace excellence can be contagious

Serguei Netessine

Team performance can often be more, or less, than the sum of the parts. So it’s significant that research has demonstrated that collective outcomes soar when top performers mingle with less adept colleagues.

North America's accent problem

Wayne Turmel

As a Canadian who spends a lot of time on international conference calls and webinars, it's impossible not to notice that almost everyone can deal with foreign accents except (North) Americans.

Choosing to be humble

John Blakey

The sad story of ‘Big Sam’ Allardyce, the shortest-serving manager in English football history, is a classic example of someone falling foul of habit No.6 of a trusted executive - choosing to be humble.

Feelings vs reasoning

Duane Dike

The older I get, the more I see that rather than ignoring people’s expressions of feeling, managers ought to welcome them as good for business and realize that results can improve when you listen and respond appropriately to them.

Fish in a different pond

Andy Hanselman

If you always do what you've always done, you'll always get what you've always had. That why you need to start thinking and doing differently if you want to generate any real innovation.

The hidden history of remote working

Wayne Turmel

Forget Gartner studies and erudite articles in HBR, the way we work remotely today has come about through guesswork and trial-and-error. It was never planned - which is why organizations have a hard time dealing with it.

Overcoming diversity fatigue

David Livermore

Too many diversity initiatives fail because they’re based on a punitive, ‘shame on you’ posture. What we need is a strategic, hope-filled approach emphasizing what we all gain from more diverse and inclusive workplaces and communities.

Seven signs of the Greed Syndrome

Manfred Kets De Vries

Given the high value our culture places on materialism, perhaps it isn't surprising that greed and excess are hallmarks of many executives. But how do we recognise and deal with uncontrolled greed?

What to say when your kid becomes a manager

Wayne Turmel

I had one of those moments of intense pride followed by a blinding flash of panic this week. My kid has gotten her first real big-girl management job. There are a few things I’d like to tell her - but she won’t listen, of course.

What happens when no one is in charge?

Rod Collins

Far from being insane or utopian, the idea that you can build a successful enterprise where there are no bosses represents an evolutionary leap in organizational design that may very well represent the future of management.

Ride your stress like a mule

Max McKeown

Pushing your limits is what allows you to grow stronger, so if you find yourself feeling passive, it can make sense to dial your stress up a little. Get moving. Accomplish something small. Do something you enjoy. Then start again.