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Duane Dike

What exactly is intelligence? Is it something measured by an IQ test? Or should we also consider more subtle traits like humor, the ability to figure things out or storytelling?

Getting stuck in

Mike France

One of the big advantages of being a smaller, more agile business, is that senior management can get stuck in with their employees during busy periods. So perhaps its time more executives spent less time in the boardroom and more in the dispatch room

Why the Internet of Things changes everything

Rod Collins

We are on the cusp of the second wave of the digital revolution, one which promises to be far more transformative than the first and which will change the fundamental dynamics of how our social structures work.

Managing time in meetings

Wayne Turmel

Often when running a meeting - be it physical or virtual - we can get so focused on "getting everything done" in the allotted time slot that we forget to focus on what it is we're actually supposed to accomplish.

Preparing teams to lead innovative change

Henrik Bresman

Today’s fast-moving industries demand a new model of organisational change that rejects the top-down, linear process of the past in favour of a more democratised, inclusive and open-ended paradigm.

Hire for how they learn, not what they know

Max McKeown

Learning new things is at the heart of innovation. That's why how a person learns is far more important than what they know. So you need to hire people not for what they know now, but because they can adapt to the future.

The bad influence of aggressive bosses

Manfred Kets De Vries

Identifying with an aggressor is a basic strategy for human survival. But in the workplace, such behaviour is destructive and needs to be called out.

Words of mass disruption

Janet Howd

Unless we can start to discern truth from falsehood, the slow but persistent infiltration of spurious news will inevitably lead humanity down the road of serious physical consequences.

Learning is everywhere

Wayne Turmel

What you know now is good for now, but might be completely outdated by tomorrow. This means there's a constant need to learn new things - both formally and - increasingly - informally.

Digital transformation and the power of collective intelligence

Rod Collins

As hierarchies give way to networks in our digital future, we need to understand how collective intelligence works and how to harness it - as well as how to protect ourselves from its dark side.

Why wisdom can't be taught

Manfred Kets De Vries

Intelligence and wisdom are quite different things. But while wisdom requires education, education does not necessarily make people wise. So how can we expedite the road to wisdom?

Ideas are fragile (handle with care)

Max McKeown

Which kind of ideas culture do you have? If someone in your organisation has an idea, is it welcomed? Or has hierarchy and history conspired to disconnect the part that thinks from the part that does, making innovation impossible?

Leadership, innovation and the future

Duane Dike

Leaders are critical to innovative thinking. Great ideas don't emerge from companies whose leaders try to control and micromanage. Innovation only thrives in organizations whose members are free to think and express themselves.

Quantum physics and quarky behavior

Kieran Hearty

If you want to understand some of the less acceptable aspects of human nature the answer may lie in quantum physics. And the same ‘quarkiness’ that explains bad behavior can also be used to energize and motivate those around us.

It's the little things, stupid

Wayne Turmel

For most of us, the big things - like the global economy - are out of our control. So let's turn off the news for a while and focus on the little things that happen at work that make so many managers lives far more complicated than they need to be.

Nobody is smarter or faster than everybody

Rod Collins

The myth of the individual hero is just that: a myth. The smartest organizations aren't those with the smartest elite individuals, but those that understand that their most valuable asset is the collective intelligence of their people.

We all need proper vacations

Peter Vajda

We've said it before and we'll say it again. Everyone needs a proper holiday. Taking real time out from work is a non-negotiable necessity if we're to to maintain a healthy mind, body and soul.

Strategic change is all in the timing

Quy Huy

Large organisations have many different heartbeats, and change managers need to listen to them all in order to align the pace and rhythm of their change intervention with their desired outcomes.

Everyday leadership

Duane Dike

Over the years, I’ve lost count of the number of leadership theories and styles that I’ve studied, practiced and discarded. What all this has taught me is that leadership is a complicated puzzle - and that the best solution is to keep things simple.

Don't use technology as an excuse for bad management

Wayne Turmel

When it comes to managing a remote team, technology is not a communication problem. So stop blaming the tools if you chose the wrong one for the wrong reason.

The truth about change

Peter Vajda

The reason change so often fails is that we resist letting go of old ideas and beliefs. But you cannot change and remain the same. Change means the letting go of the old and encouraging something new to develop. And that's as true for organizations as it is for individuals.

And some more

Why wisdom can't be taught

Manfred Kets De Vries

Intelligence and wisdom are quite different things. But while wisdom requires education, education does not necessarily make people wise. So how can we expedite the road to wisdom?

Turning around a dysfunctional team

Matt Jenkins

Bringing together a group of smart, creative and driven people doesn’t mean they’ll instantly work in sync. In fact, three-quarters of cross-functional teams are dysfunctional in one way or another. Here are some ways to address that.

What every company should learn from United Airlines

Rod Collins

In a hyper-connected world, everyone in an organization should remember they work for their customers, not their bosses. Companies never go out of business because they lose their bosses. They only disappear when they lose their customers.

Developing a digital mindset

Rohit Talwar

How can a business succeed online when 'online' appears to be changing by the day? What do we need to do tomorrow? How much should we be spending? What if we get it wrong? The place to start is by developing a digital mindset.

The two big communication questions

Wayne Turmel

Communication increasingly seems to be a question of technology. But it isn’t. It's a complicated process with lots of moving parts. And it starts with two very important questions

So you're a manager. Now what?

Dan Bobinski

As managers, we can either choose to value and develop our team members or we can look for ways to elevate our own stature. Do you know which category you fall into?

A time for every season

Duane Dike

In too many organizations, older workers get written off ‘village idiots’. But that’s a big mistake - after all these are the people who know its history, remember how things used to be and know what works and what doesn’t.

Why holacracy may not work for extraverts

Rod Collins

For all its good intentions, holacracy has a fatal flaw. It is a system designed for introverts that leaves extraverts isolated and frustrated at what feels like tedious and lifeless interaction.

A recipe for employee motivation

Morten Bennedsen

Absenteeism is less prevalent in family firms than in non-family firms. That’s because how much time employees take off and hence the effort they put into their jobs is largely a factor of an organisation’s culture.

And still more...

A white guy's humble advice to black professionals

David Livermore

Companies are chasing diverse candidates. But how can those candidates use cultural intelligence to help them find the kind of employer who will include their perspectives as a critical part of their strategy rather than using them to up their diversity counts?

Life as a Public Sector COO

Patrick Davies

Many CEOs benefit from a 'wingman' - a COO who compliments their leadership on a daily, operational basis. And as Patrick Davies, Deputy Head of Mission at the British Embassy in Washington, explains, the same is true of his role in the Foreign Service.

Do your filters stop you from hearing?

Peter Vajda

Every time you have a conversation, what you hear gets distorted by the unconscious listening filters each of us develops early in life and carries with us into adulthood. And that means that too often, we listen but we don't really hear.

Key skills for virtual leaders

Wayne Turmel

Leading a virtual team is a tough call, so here are seven key behaviors that leaders of virtual teams need to develop to be successful.

The emotional sophistication tomorrow's leaders will need

Quy Huy

It is emotional relationships that transform professional collectives into productive communities. That’s why, in an increasingly automated workplace, leaders should concentrate on their human skillsets.

Success depends on you

Janet Howd

One of the most stressful situations anyone can find themselves in is delivering a presentation. But as with any human endeavour, the key to delivering a successful outcome is simple. Practise.

How to increase the effectiveness of leadership team meetings

Achim Preuss

Poorly-managed meetings are a catastrophic waste of time, leading to poor decisions, unresolved problems and missed opportunities. So here are six actions that can make leadership team meetings more productive.

Designing spaces for the connected leader

Melanie Redman

There’s a growing acknowledgement that hierarchical management structures are no longer effective in a hyper-connected world. But one aspect of the workplace remains stubbornly consistent: the spaces that leaders work in.

The future of strategy

Rod Collins

In today’s world, change is exponential and the past is no longer a proxy for the future. That’s why the most important strategic decision that business leaders need to make is to know when it is time to change

Transparency and the inner wolf

John Blakey

The United Airlines saga is just the latest reminder that many CEOs only care about ‘us’ when the chips are down, when they have to and when everyone is looking.

Boredom, smartphones and cultural intelligence

David Livermore

Moments of boredom free up our mind to think creatively. But who has time to be bored these days? Most people seem to be glued to their smartphones whenever there’s a moment to spare.

Should we judge?

Duane Dike

Making assumptions about others is a risky business. We don’t know their lives. We don’t know their happiness or their loneliness. We don’t know how they confront their issues. So why not converse? Enjoy it while you can, then move on when the environment changes.