A climate of fear

2009

Fear can make people do funny things, especially if their livelihood is on the line. But, let's be honest, as the economy has slowed down to a crawl, is this fear really rational? Are we all at risk of losing our jobs? This fear of unemployment and its effects on us – while we're still employed – is explored in this interesting article.

Think about times when you've been afraid in the past. Did your behavior change? Did you start fumbling through actions? Chances are that you may be feeling a bit under the gun at the office due to this turbulent economy and increasing amounts of bad news.

Such worries are likely to have some unintended consequences, such as careless mistakes in work (due to lack of concentration), or less productivity (due to more time overanalyzing and second guessing others' work. This is especially difficult for those working as consultants who have to please their hiring boss as well as their client.

While a healthy dose of fear and concern are both logical and appropriate, letting such feelings get out of hand to the point that we jeopardize our work by the low level of its quality isn't going to do you any favors. In fact, it's likely to get you pushed out even faster. In times of professional uncertainty, keeping your head down and nose to the grindstone may just be what you need to make it through to the light at the end of the tunnel.

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Older Comments

While 'keeping your head down and nose to the grindstone' is a good suggestion. Fear can invade your ability to problem solve. Francie Dalton offers five tips to help you work through fear: (1) identify all components, (2) identify the causal components, (3) focus on one solution, (4) write and implementation plan.

Oscar Orlando www.daltonalliances.com