How do you feel about your boss?

2008

I write a lot about employees who hate their bosses, but it turns out that someone has actually done an academic study about employees and their feelings toward their bosses.

It was carried out at Florida Statue University in 2006 and questioned 700 American workers in a wide array of careers and asked them their opinions about their managers. The study results were published on the FSU website.

Among the results to emerge from the study were the following:

  • Thirty-one percent of respondents reported that their supervisor gave them the "silent treatment" in the past year.
  • Thirty-seven percent reported that their supervisor failed to give credit when due.
  • Thirty-nine percent noted that their supervisor failed to keep promises.
  • Twenty-seven percent noted that their supervisor made negative comments about them to other employees or managers.
  • Twenty-four percent reported that their supervisor invaded their privacy.
  • Twenty-three percent indicated that their supervisor blames others to cover up mistakes or to minimize embarrassment.

Also, according to those conducting the survey, "Employees stuck in an abusive relationship experienced more exhaustion, job tension, nervousness, depressed mood and mistrust. They also were less likely to take on additional tasks, such as working longer or on weekends, and were generally less satisfied with their job. Also, employees were more likely to leave if involved in an abusive relationship than if dissatisfied with pay."

The study offers a few suggestions for improving things such as staying visible to your boss and trying to keep an optimistic outlook. Finally, the study suggests not taking abuse of any kind lightly, but reporting it whenever possible.

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Older Comments

I am lucky to have a wonderful boss. She treats me like an equal and apologizes when she has to 'give an order' on the run.

She allows the department enough lee way to get the job done without micromanaging. In fact , duringour morning meetings she explains concepts and time lines then ends the meeting by saying 'go forth and produce ...on time' When she leaves the building her comments are 'call me if you need me ....but I trust you won't need me.'

My boss will defend us when other departments critisize us and she makes sure that we all know that she is pleased and satisfied with a job. If we fail she uses it as a teaching moment.

Glynnis Botha Oregon, USA