Kicking a bad habit


Smoking in the workplace has been all over the news in recent months, especially since many cities across Europe and North America have outright banned it.

However, there is another problem with respect to the implementation of this law that bothers health advocates and law-makers – companies' general lack of interest or perceived value in getting workers to stop smoking.

In short, don't smoke here, do what you like afterwards. A recent article in MarketWatch shows how bad the apathy is.

To some degree, I can understand an employer's reticence to do anything beyond outlawing smoking on the premises. After all, one's private life is just that.

However, the spirit of the law may implore employers to go beyond their duty. Surely it's still in their interest to have their employees in the best health possible? Even from a practical point of view (read: money), getting employees to stop smoking can reduce insurance premiums.

In light of those business reasons for getting employees to kick a bad habit, perhaps more companies will partake in programs geared towards helping employees get cigarettes out of their lives.


Older Comments

It would make sense for all employers to help their employees get healthier. Healthier employees have less absenteeism, are happier, and more productive than those who are unhealthy. Companies should assist with smoking cessation as well as providing support for employee physical fitness programs.